April 24, 2015 IODC1
This is an action area being developed as part of the IODC Roadmap project. >>View other action areas.

The challenge

actionIcon-03 250Promoting good practices on open data standards is key to scaling the impact of open data. Far too often users of open data face small but time-consuming technical hurdles that slow down progress towards open data impact. Balancing the consistency and re-usability of data with the great variation in national and regional structures, cultures and political processes requires carefully designed data standards, and common approaches to build the right levels of interoperability. With good standardisation practices, it becomes possible to innovate more rapidly, and to identify the solutions that work in one place, and build on them to apply that solution elsewhere.

For this reason, governments, citizens, civil society organisations and the private sector need to come together to identify and promote good practices on open data standards. This requires global efforts on awareness and education about standards, as well as close collaboration between jurisdictions to promote common approaches to data standardization.

Proposals

The following draft actions were developed through sessions at IODC15. You are invited to share your feedback on these actions using the comments box below. A final roadmap of actions will be published in mid-2015.

Key action: Prioritise and promote good practices for open data publication

Data providers need guidance and support to prioritise the application of good practices for open data publication. Building stronger links between technical standards communities, and the producers and users of open government data, is vital to ensure that best practices put forward serve the needs of all citizens, businesses and governments wanting to use data, rather than assuming high levels of technical skill. This requires increased engagement of diverse data users in the standards development process.

Additional action: Engagement with W3C Data on the Web Practices

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) have produced a number of ‘First Public Working Draft’ documents relating to practices for publishing data on the web. These include the Data on the Web Best Practices, Data Quality Vocabulary, and Data Usage Vocabulary. Public comments are invited on each of these documents, and the groups are keen to get wider input from beyond the ‘usual suspects’ taking part in data standards processes.

Get involvedMore information | Look at the latest published drafts and share your comments

Additional action: Recommendations from the OGP Open Data Working Group

The OGP Open Data Working Group have produced draft research on “Identifying recommended standards and best practices for open data” which is open for comment. This research will feed into final recommendations at the 2015 OGP Summit, and will form an input into the Open Data Charter Implementation Handbook.

Get involvedMore information | Share your comments on the recommendations

Action anchors

Action anchors are taking a lead on shaping the conversation in the run up to the conference, and facilitating the conference session. They will be blogging about the key issues to be address, and existing initiatives that respond to the challenges in this area.

Blog posts

  • Governments need clear direction for open data action May 21, 2015 - A guest post from Steven De Costa on the need for Guidelines, Collaborations and Best Practices to accelerate open data adoption in governments. The challenge for individual agencies to develop data access methods that strike the best balance between data confidentiality, protecting privacy, maintaining data quality and releasing data that’s interpretable, relevant and actually valuable to users, […]
  • Can standards take us over the tipping point and accelerate open data ecosystems? May 20, 2015 - A guest post from Yasodara Cordova, from W3C Brazil, on the Data on the Web Best Practices, and the need to link together policy and technology conversations.  The activists who advocate for Open Data, and the Governments that are involved through initiatives like the Open Government Partnership, sometimes seem to be dancing out of step. Maybe […]
  • Why do we struggle to standardize, and what should we prioritize? May 8, 2015 - A guest post from James McKinney of Open North sharing research into open the challenges and opportunities for data standards best practice.  Open data is now on the agenda of most OGP governments and of many sub-national governments. However, its success is inconsistent: many citizens use open data for public transit through mobile apps, but many […]

Proposals

Proposals for addressing this challenge will be developed over the course of IODC15, and shared here shortly afterwards.



April 14, 2015 IODC0
This is an action area being developed as part of the IODC Roadmap project. >>View other action areas.

The challenge

actionIcon-02 250Sustained political leadership is fundamental to the success of national open data initiatives. There is increasing political support behind open data around the world, as demonstrated by the growth in membership of the Open Government Partnership (OGP) from 8 members in 2011 to 65 in 2014. Open data can increase transparency about what governments are doing – which promotes accountability and good governance, enhances public debate, helps to combat corruption, and supports the design and delivery of better public services. It is therefore essential for governments to support each other in the implementation of open data initiatives, notably through international collaboration and sharing of best practices and lessons learned in open data. The creation of a global network of open data leaders in government can reinforce the political support already demonstrated by many governments around the world, and can ensure sustainable government involvement in the global open data movement.

Proposals

The following draft actions were developed through sessions at IODC15. You are invited to share your feedback on these actions using the comments box below. A final roadmap of actions will be published in mid-2015.

Key action:Expand opportunities for leadership development

The range of opportunities for government leaders at all levels to develop their practice around open data should be expanded, in order to make sure pioneering practice is shared, and the culture change needed for open data becomes an embedded part of government business. Delivering open data intiatives involves processes of change: cultural, organisational and technological. And it requires models of leadership development that are based on peer-to-peer exchange of ideas – allowing shared learning between government officials, and between governments, civil society and the private sector. Creating the space for the leaders or open data projects to engage in local and international networks can help break down issolation and silos, and can support the circulation of good practices and problem solving. This requires both brokers to deliver leadership networking opportunities, and the buy-in from governments, willing to give their open data leaders the time to engage in learning networks.

Additional action:Network of Innovators

The beta-test of the GovLab Network of Innovators was released at IODC15, enables innovators from inside and outside of government to indicate skills they can share, skills they want to learn, and skills they can signpost people to. The platform supports match-making between innovators. GovLab will continue to beta-test the Network of Innovators at key upcoming open data events, working towards a wider public launch, and scaling up the network.

Get involvedMore information | Sign up to share your skills & find opportunities to connect

Additional action:Open Data Leaders Network

The Open Data Institute’s (ODI) Open Data Leaders Network (ODLN) responds to the common challenges faced by government open data leaders across the world: developing a flexible programme of opportunities to exchange ideas, learning, inspiration, challenges and stories of impact. An effective network builds the trust needed for genuine peer-to-peer support. With OD4D support, the Leaders’ Network will scale-up, and scale-out, creating opportunities for leadership learning for members of governments – city, regional and national. ODI will continue to promote the work of ODLN participants, and to support the development of a community of practice where leaders drive the agenda. The ODLN will have a programme of meetings in 2015, and is working to expand to include additional government leaders from around the world.

Get involvedMore information | Find out more about the Open Data Leaders Network

Additional action:OAS Trainings, Briefings and Fellowships

The Organisation of American States brings together 35 member countries, many of whom have established leadership roles in open data. Through bringing together leaders at many different levels, from public sector officials, to practitioners, and youth, OAS can support open data leadership. OAS members are diverse: from Canada to the Caribbean, and countries right across Latin America: this demands a simple and flexible structure for network leadership. OAS will be working to develop methodologies that can support learning across contexts, but also strengthen local leadership learning and practice. In August, the OAS will support open data activities at the Fifth Ministerial Conference on the Information Society, taking place in Mexico.

Get involvedMore information | Find out more about the OAS Open Government Fellowship

Action anchors

Action anchors are taking a lead on shaping the conversation in the run up to the conference, and facilitating the conference session. They will be blogging about the key issues to be address, and existing initiatives that respond to the challenges in this area.

Blog posts

  • Strengthening Open Data Leadership in Government June 16, 2015 - A guest post from Felipe González-Zapata Carla Bonina led an interesting discussion about the role of open data leaders in government and the relevance of leader networks for the transfer of experiences and knowledge on open data projects at the 3rd Open Data Conference  (#iodc15 #leadership). Participants of this session included open data leaders such as […]
  • Matching Demand to the Supply of Open Data Know How: The Network of Innovators Experiment May 28, 2015 - A guest post from Beth Simone Noveck of GovLab about the Network of Innovators. Well over 1000 participants from around the world are expected to arrive in Ottawa today for the Third International Open Data Conference (IODC). The event follows last month’s first-of-its-kind Pew survey on open government data. Over forty countries have created open data […]
  • Leadership on Open Data, audiences and strategies: Collaboration networks in Latin America and the Caribbean. May 26, 2015 - A second guest post from Mike Mora of the Organization of American States.  Open data has been an active area of interest in Latin America and the Caribbean for a few years now – of course the Data Revolution and the Open Government Partnership (accounting for 17 of the 35 Latin-American countries) have been important […]
  • Leadership for an open data future May 15, 2015 - A guest post from Liz Carolan of the Open Data Institute. As part of our work at Open Data Institute my colleagues and I have the privilege of meeting with exceptional government leaders from around the world who promote open data’s benefits in their countries and regions. Open data is still a new and emerging […]
  • Not going out of business May 14, 2015 - A guest post from Mike Mora, on the vital case for networks of learning and collaboration. In the age of the knowledge society one could take for granted that public sector leaders are well suited to take on most pressing tasks. But for the most part, despite noble efforts, government leaders continue to struggling to provide […]

Proposals

Proposals for addressing this challenge will be developed over the course of IODC15, and shared here shortly afterwards.


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